Aika. Aeka. Same thing.

collegehumor:

Thor Goes to See Thor
Ticket prices these days sure do hammer you.

collegehumor:

Thor Goes to See Thor

Ticket prices these days sure do hammer you.

(Source: dumpaday.com)

collegehumor:

I get base pay plus commission, which is bacon.

collegehumor:

I get base pay plus commission, which is bacon.

(Source: reddit.com)

The iPad Air. An early adoption.

The iPad Air’s form factor is a major improvement when compared to previous iPad iterations, mostly borrowing designs from the iPad mini. As a result, it is much lighter than my previous iPad 3rd generation, and a lot faster.

Battery life is adequate for a whole day normal use with WiFi and Bluetooth switched on.

Speed is what I would expect from a faster A7 chip but I feel that a lot of future iOS improvements would boost speed and response time even further. For a 64-bit operating system, I do feel that the response time has been soft-limited artificially - perhaps to “encourage” the masses to upgrade to the new iPad’s? I don’t know for sure, but as a developer, it sure feels like it.

Am I a fan of iOS 7? No. But it is a necessary transition to a more fluid interface. Speaking of transitions between screens, there is just an overabundance of it. In the Accessibility section in my iPad Air’s Settings, I enable Reduce Motion and Increase Contrast.

I have also taken my iPad Air for a spin within a corporate environment; taking meeting notes and sharing project documents with clients. There isn’t much difference with using an older generation iPad. However, the lighter weight makes it feel as if I was using a writing pad rather than a stone slate as with previous iPad generations. It is very comfortable to use and carry at work.

The only uncomfortable aspect of the iPad Air is that I really do need a case for it; not much for protection than for a more comfortable grip. The smooth back and sides don’t lend to a grip that you get when, say, holding a book. As of now, though, iPad Air cases are practically non-existant. I am targeting for a case with a built-in keyboard and Logitech seems to have one that is light and low profile, albeit a little on the expensive side: the Logitech Fabric Skin Keyboard Folio for iPad Air. Even the name is a mouthful. At $150, it better be good.

TSA’s New Instagram Account Highlights The Crazy Things People Try To Sneak On Planes
Greg Kumparak, techcrunch.com
Seem­ing­ly tired of being chewed out by every third trav­el­er to step through their scan­ners, the TSA is try­ing some­thing new to con­nect with the peo­ple: Insta­gram. And, uh… it’s actu­al­ly pret­ty frig­gin’ effec­tive.Over the last few…

Well this is a cool Instagram account to follow.

TSA’s New Instagram Account Highlights The Crazy Things People Try To Sneak On Planes
Greg Kumparak, techcrunch.com

Seem­ing­ly tired of being chewed out by every third trav­el­er to step through their scan­ners, the TSA is try­ing some­thing new to con­nect with the peo­ple: Insta­gram. And, uh… it’s actu­al­ly pret­ty frig­gin’ effec­tive.

Over the last few…

Well this is a cool Instagram account to follow.

My First Oakley

These just arrived; my first Oakley sunglasses and they look awesome. They are Oakley Pitbull VR28 HDO polarized which enhances contrast.

I’ll be taking them for a test drive. Using them at noon so far brings out clarity in everything and gives a warm tint. They fold in nice and compact, too.

My First Oakley

These just arrived; my first Oakley sunglasses and they look awesome. They are Oakley Pitbull VR28 HDO polarized which enhances contrast.

I’ll be taking them for a test drive. Using them at noon so far brings out clarity in everything and gives a warm tint. They fold in nice and compact, too.

What I’m Reading Now

I have always had a curiosity in medieval life since I was introduced to it in history class of junior high in the United Kingdom.
Unlike Malaysian history, European medieval history is almost always devoid of myth. No flying boats, deities and superhuman powers.
This particular book I had found it in a bookstore in Dubai. It is also available on the Kindle Store.
Apart from the sheer curiosity, this book looks back at how we micro-evolved into the civilization we live in today. History might try to repeat itself but at least we look back and try to prevent what was and what might become.

What I’m Reading Now

I have always had a curiosity in medieval life since I was introduced to it in history class of junior high in the United Kingdom.

Unlike Malaysian history, European medieval history is almost always devoid of myth. No flying boats, deities and superhuman powers.

This particular book I had found it in a bookstore in Dubai. It is also available on the Kindle Store.

Apart from the sheer curiosity, this book looks back at how we micro-evolved into the civilization we live in today. History might try to repeat itself but at least we look back and try to prevent what was and what might become.

nick0819 said: Just wondering, what case do you have on your iPhone 5? It looks pretty clean on it!

I really can’t recall. It was the first case I got out of the store that was both cheap and no frills. At the time, I had no choice.

Now, I just cover the front and back with Invisible Shield. I am ultra careful with all my gadgets and love the feel of the slim profile of the iPhone 5. Otherwise, I highly recommend the cases made by Ozaka.

The slim Ozaka cases I have tried and are very good. There is even one that mimics the look of the iPhone 5 (minus the Apple logo). It makes your phone look like it has no case.

The Kensington KeyFolio Pro 2 for iPad Mini
I have been carrying and using my iPad Mini everywhere I go almost exclusively. My iPad 3 is just lying dormant on my desk. I do miss my iPad 3 for just one reason: I have a great ultrathin keyboard that goes with it. Then, just a couple of days ago, I came across the KeyFolio Pro 2 for the iPad Mini. I bought it immediately.
Made by Kensington, the KeyFolio Pro 2 is a first for me in a sense that it features a case with a detachable Bluetooth keyboard. It has the same width as the iPad Mini and therefore is much lighter than the case itself.
Because of the small size of the keyboard, it takes getting used to. It took me a day to get accustomed to the small, close proximity keys. However, for people with large fingertips, I honestly cannot recommend it. Even with my medium sized fingertips, I still sometimes hit neighboring keys. Even so, the mobility it provides me outweighs the occasional typo (thank you Autocorrect).
Like all iPad Bluetooth keyboards, this one charges via an included, albeit short, micro USB cable. The keyboard latches onto the case with 4 strong magnets. Those with pacemakers beware.
Because the keyboard itself is fully detachable from the case, you can position it as you would a normal keyboard on the table. Then, you can adjust the viewing angle of your iPad Mini by velcro. However, I found that, with the keyboard in attached to the case, it makes the combination unusable because of the acute viewing angle. The bottom line is you really need to detach the keyboard and work with it that way.
As an added bonus, the center of the case has a small elastic band to hold a slim pen or a slim iPad stylus.
All in all, this keyboard rocks, if you don’t have fat fingers and like to type on a desk or table. It takes a while to get used to but the mobility it provides is worth the effort. This whole review was typed using this keyboard. If you use an iPad Mini on a daily basis, go get this keyboard.

The Kensington KeyFolio Pro 2 for iPad Mini

I have been carrying and using my iPad Mini everywhere I go almost exclusively. My iPad 3 is just lying dormant on my desk. I do miss my iPad 3 for just one reason: I have a great ultrathin keyboard that goes with it. Then, just a couple of days ago, I came across the KeyFolio Pro 2 for the iPad Mini. I bought it immediately.

Made by Kensington, the KeyFolio Pro 2 is a first for me in a sense that it features a case with a detachable Bluetooth keyboard. It has the same width as the iPad Mini and therefore is much lighter than the case itself.

Because of the small size of the keyboard, it takes getting used to. It took me a day to get accustomed to the small, close proximity keys. However, for people with large fingertips, I honestly cannot recommend it. Even with my medium sized fingertips, I still sometimes hit neighboring keys. Even so, the mobility it provides me outweighs the occasional typo (thank you Autocorrect).

Like all iPad Bluetooth keyboards, this one charges via an included, albeit short, micro USB cable. The keyboard latches onto the case with 4 strong magnets. Those with pacemakers beware.

Because the keyboard itself is fully detachable from the case, you can position it as you would a normal keyboard on the table. Then, you can adjust the viewing angle of your iPad Mini by velcro. However, I found that, with the keyboard in attached to the case, it makes the combination unusable because of the acute viewing angle. The bottom line is you really need to detach the keyboard and work with it that way.

As an added bonus, the center of the case has a small elastic band to hold a slim pen or a slim iPad stylus.

All in all, this keyboard rocks, if you don’t have fat fingers and like to type on a desk or table. It takes a while to get used to but the mobility it provides is worth the effort. This whole review was typed using this keyboard. If you use an iPad Mini on a daily basis, go get this keyboard.